Stem Cell Optimization Therapy

In this Analysis, I’ll first

Section A

Theory

 

Stem cells, unlike any other cells in the body, can self-renew and differentiate into many different kinds of cells. (5) Early embryonic stem cells can differentiate into virtually any kind of cell, in any kind of tissue. Adults retain stem cells in all of their organs and tissues. Adult stem cells can still regenerate and differentiate, but usually only into mature cells in their particular tissue type.4,5

When tissue is damaged, tissue-specific stem cells leap into action, quickly forming into functional replacements for the damaged cells.4,5 In short, adult stem cells account for the healthy adult body’s ability to self-heal, and to retain its youthful vigor.

Recent studies now show that stem cell function declines with advancing age—falling victim to such threats as oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA damage—and results in impaired ability of tissues and organs to repair themselves.1 In this way, aging itself is closely related to the accumulation of dysfunctional stem cells.1-5

Fortunately, one of the very causes of stem cell dysfunction can now be leveraged to prevent or reverse such dysfunction. Regulation through favorable alterations in gene expression is considered a major means of establishing and maintaining normal stem cell activities.2,4 We can now provide to living stem cells substances that exert favorable changes.

Section B

Evidence

To optimize longevity, the stem cell pathway needs to be addressed. As the Institute has shown elsewhere,  aging is closely associated with a loss of the number and function of adult stem cells throughout the body (1,5) We therefore need to know how to organize one’s day for the production of stem cells to be maxed. One of these is via food and supplementation a few elements or extracts of which are  berries and green tea, the dipeptide carnosine, and vitamin D, all of these, either via food or supplementation have the ability to favorably alter gene expression leading to the production of additional stem cells.

 Using these nutrients mentioned above, scientists at the James A. Haly Veterans Affair Hospital in Tampa  fed young and aged rats either a standard diet or a nutrient-rich diet composed of a mixture of blueberry, green tea, vitamin D, and carnosine—all nutrients with known cell-protective effects—for 28 days. At the end of that period, the researchers collected blood serum from the older, supplemented rats and applied it to cultures of adult rat stem cells. One group of stem cells came from the memory-intensive brain area called the hippocampus, and the other from bone marrow, where blood cells and platelets are formed. (7)

Serum from aged rats that were on the control diet had the expected effect on the cultured stem cells: their division rates slowed dramatically, producing fewer new stem cells. But serum from the supplemented aged rats did notcause those changes, and in fact produced results not different from those of serum obtained from young rats. This study demonstrated that targeted nutrient supplementation alone could rescue aging stem cells involved in both brain and blood system functions.This has prompted interest in ways of improving stem cell functionality in maturing individuals. (6-8)

A growing number of studies demonstrate that application of a number of molecules that support metabolic function, protect against oxidative stress, prevent inflammation, and protect DNA repair can enhance the numbers – and function – of aging stem cells.9,11,12

Case in Point: Multiple Sclerosis

The second important study recently published demonstrated the impact of vitamin D on brain stem cells in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). MS is an autoimmune disease that damages nerve cells by impairing their ability to conduct signals. While treatments can slow the disease, it is considered incurable.8

Researchers used a mouse model of MS to determine whether vitamin D treatment could improve nerve function by protecting neuronal stem cells and by promoting their functions. Amazingly, they found that vitamin D supplementation reversed the nerve cell damage created by MS.8

Furthermore, they found that the supplement promoted the proliferation of neuronal stem cells, which contributed directly to improved brain function, and to their apparent recovery from MS. This study offered additional insights into how vitamin D could directly contribute to alleviating a condition in which adult stem cell function is compromised.

Beneficial Epigenetic Changes

The third study also focused on stem cells in the brain and the impact of specific nutrients on brain function. Here, the researchers based their work on the observation that the decline in aging brain stem cells appears to be closely associated with increased levels of inflammatory signaling molecules, or cytokines. 6

They supplemented rats with carnosine, blueberry, green tea, and vitamin D, the same group of nutrients previously proven to rescue aging stem cells. They found that supplemented animals had a large number of changes in the expression of genes concerned with a range of cellular functions.6 More specifically, they helped reduce proinflammatory cytokines, while increasing anti-inflammatory cytokines. The reduction in inflammation would explain the beneficial effects of the nutrients on stem cell function demonstrated in previous experiments.9

But the researchers dug deeper and made a remarkable discovery—the nutrient combination increased the production of genes that prompt progenitor cells (stem-like cells living in brain tissue) into becoming functioning adult neurons. In other words, it helped create healthy new brain cells.

This study powerfully demonstrates how targeted nutrients can favorably alter the environment faced by tissue stem cells in the brain, reducing the risk that they will develop into impaired, aged stem cells, and promoting their development instead into functioning adult brain cells. This is especially important for those at risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. These diseases are known to be associated with declining rates of brain cell renewal, which we now recognize requires healthy stem cells.6,10

Together, these three recent studies strongly indicate that specific nutrients can produce tremendous effects on adult tissue stem cells, helping protect them against the destructive impact of environmental factors, and preserving their ability to naturally heal tissues and restore their youthful function.

Nutrients Promote Stem Cell Vigor

One large group of researchers has published extensively on their studies with a nutrient combination containing polyphenols from blueberry and green tea, as well as carnosine and vitamin D. Their work has shown that these nutrients promote the proliferation of healthy human adult stem cells, protect those cells from the destructive effects of oxidative stress, and produce improved cognitive and memory function in animals as a result of enhanced brain stem cell proliferation.9,11,12

Numerous other studies show that other common, readily-available nutritional supplements can also boost stem cell function in a meaningful way, to further slow stem cell-related aging. Let’s take a look at the highlights:

In one study, a supplement containing green tea, astragalus, goji berry extracts, ellagic acid, and vitamin D fermented with a probiotic Lactobacillus species, was given to human volunteers twice daily for 2 weeks. Within a day, and continuing for the rest of the study, researchers detected significant increases in circulating bone marrow stem cells. They believe this was caused by stimulation of the body’s natural repair mechanisms (stem cells) by the nutraceutical combination.  13

Blueberry extracts are rich in polyphenols, which are highly protective molecules associated with a host of health benefits. A study in rats showed that supplementing animals in early life with a blueberry-enriched diet prevented bone loss (osteoporosis) at menopause.14 Closer examination of the protective effect revealed that the blueberry supplement stimulated bone-forming stem cells to mature into active bone-mineralizing cells. This action reduced the high post-menopausal rate of bone turnover that, in humans, results in easy fractures.  14,15

Spirulina is a blue-green algae that is known for its anti-inflammatory properties. A recent study showed that spirulina could prevent inflammation-induced decreases in brain stem cell proliferation that accumulates with aging.16 This resulted in improved functioning of stem cell mitochondria, which improved energy utilization and reduced oxidative stress.

Summary

Recent research has revealed the crucial role of adult stem cells in promoting healing and regeneration following damage. Over time, their loss of function deprives our tissues of their youthful ability to recover from damage and regenerate themselves. This contributes to the loss of function that we see as aging.

The good news is that rejuvenating those adult stem cells can lead to a partial reversal of aging in our tissues. Even better, three landmark studies have shown us that rejuvenation of adult tissue stem cells is within our reach.

Supplementation with a variety of nutrients has been shown to restore the healing and regenerative capacities of aging adult stem cells, and results in the restoration of youthful function to the tissues where those stem cells reside.

The pace of scientific discovery in the nutrients realm continues to accelerate, opening the real possibility that many other nutraceuticals will be found to exert their health-promoting effects at least in part by stimulating stem cell recovery.

Alternative Holitistic Techniques to Boost Stem Cells

2-Reduce your calories – Even short-term calorie restriction can improve stem cell function. Try reducing your food intake by 20% for two weeks before you get your stem cells taken (making sure that you don’t substitute sugar as above).

3-Reduce your triglycerides – Triglycerides (TRG) are the storage system in the blood for carbohydrates that go unused. This one goes hand in hand with the first two recommendations and is also related to excess weight. This is one of our observations that comes from years of culturing cells. Stem cells grow poorly in patients with high TRG or who are obese. Get your triglycerides measured and reduce your carbs and food intake to bring them down to normal before you have your stem cells drawn.

4-Lift heavy weights and stay aerobically active – Research shows that more active older animals have better stem cells that create more boneexercise increases muscle stem cells, and weight lifters have better stem cells. In our clinic we have different

 it turns out that we all have a naturally occurring, or endogenous, supply of stem cells circulating all throughout our bodies. They live in all of our organ systems, including our joints and circulate in our blood. One would assume that the younger the patient, the more stem cells they have floating around for use. This may not be the entire story, however.

I would argue that the HEALTHIER the patient, regardless of age, the better their stem cells will signal and respond, no matter how many you have. This means that we can directly affect our stem cells to work optimally in our favor! I find this to be true in practice every day. THIS is the ticket to true healing, pain relief and anti-aging!

Patients come back singing my praises for the excellent results they have after receiving Regenerative Injection Therapies like Prolotherapy or Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) treatments. While the doctor performing the treatment has a lot to do with the outcomes in terms of diagnosis and technique, the real credit should go to the patient. Excellent outcomes have as much to do with the patient’s overall health as they do with my skills.

Nutrition & Stem Cells

As would be expected, a nutritionally optimized individual will undoubtedly benefit more from stem cell therapies than a poorly nourished one. Patients who eat a variety of whole foods, adequate protein, omega-3 [i] and other healthy fats, as well as nutrient dense vegetables and leafy greens increase a favorable outcome with stem cell therapies.

Dietary protein allows for increased amino acids as well as zinc in the body to aide in the efforts of collagen deposition [ii,iii] .

Vitamin C from food sources also improve collagen status [iv]. Dietary collagen ingestion from animal sources is highly encouraged for aiding in collagen and cartilage synthesis.

Diets high in refined carbohydrates and sugar hinder healing and the immune system [v].

Patients with impaired blood sugar handling do not respond as well to treatment. Impaired wound healing and increased infection risk are well known in diabetics [vi]. These patients do not do as well clinically with regenerative injection therapies as a whole.

As a good portion of Americans are dealing with some level of obesity and blood sugar dysregulation, nutritional intervention can go a long way in helping these patients not only manage their musculoskeletal pain but improve their outcomes with regenerative and stem cell therapies.

A varied diet of nutritionally dense whole foods, high in protein and healthy fats, and low in refined carbohydrates and other inflammatory grains will ensure that optimal tissue and blood status is achieved by supplying the body with necessary macro and micronutrients for best clinical outcome

 

 

Reference and Precision Notes

 

  1. Liang R, Ghaffari S. Stem cells, redox signaling, and stem cell aging.  Antioxid Redox Signal. 2014;20(12):1902-16.
  2. Beerman I, Rossi DJ. Epigenetic Control of Stem Cell Potential during Homeostasis, Aging, and Disease. Cell Stem Cell. 2015;16(6):613-25.
  3. Blau HM, Cosgrove BD, Ho AT. The central role of muscle stem cells in regenerative failure with aging. Nat Med.2015;21(8):854-62.
  4. Goodell MA, Rando TA. Stem cells and healthy aging. Science. 2015;350(6265):1199-204.
  5. Schultz MB, Sinclair DA. When stem cells grow old: phenotypes and mechanisms of stem cell aging. Development.2016;143(1):3-14.
  6. Flowers A, Lee JY, Acosta S, et al. NT-020 treatment reduces inflammation and augments Nrf-2 and Wnt signaling in aged rats. J Neuroinflammation. 2015;12:174.
  7. Bickford PC, Kaneko Y, Grimmig B, et al. Nutraceutical intervention reverses the negative effects of blood from aged rats on stem cells. Age (Dordr). 2015;37(5):103.
  8. Gu SG, Wang CJ, Zhao G, et al. Role of vitamin D in regulating the neural stem cells of mouse model with multiple sclerosis. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2015;19(21):4004-11.
  9. Acosta S, Jernberg J, Sanberg CD, et al. NT-020, a natural therapeutic approach to optimize spatial memory performance and increase neural progenitor cell proliferation and decrease inflammation in the aged rat. Rejuvenation Res. 2010;13(5):581-8.
  10. Hoglinger GU, Rizk P, Muriel MP, et al. Dopamine depletion impairs precursor cell proliferation in Parkinson disease. Nat Neurosci. 2004;7(7):726-35.
  11. Bickford PC, Tan J, Shytle RD, et al. Nutraceuticals synergistically promote proliferation of human stem cells. Stem Cells Dev. 2006;15(1):118-23.
  12. Shytle RD, Ehrhart J, Tan J, et al. Oxidative stress of neural, hematopoietic, and stem cells: protection by natural compounds. Rejuvenation Res. 2007;10(2):173-8.
  13. Mikirova NA, Jackson JA, Hunninghake R, et al. Nutraceutical augmentation of circulating endothelial progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells in human subjects. J Transl Med. 2010;8:34.
  14. Zhang J, Lazarenko OP, Blackburn ML, et al. Feeding blueberry diets in early life prevent senescence of osteoblasts and bone loss in ovariectomized adult female rats. PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e24486.
  15. Chen JR, Lazarenko OP, Zhang J, et al. Diet-derived phenolic acids regulate osteoblast and adipocyte lineage commitment and differentiation in young mice. J Bone Miner Res. 2014;29(5):1043-53.
  16. Bachstetter AD, Jernberg J, Schlunk A, et al. Spirulina promotes stem cell genesis and protects against LPS induced declines in neural stem cell proliferation. PLoS One. 2010;5(5):e10496.

 

 

PLoS One. 2010; 5(5): e10496. 
Published online 2010 May 5. doi:  10.1371/journal.pone.0010496
PMCID: PMC2864748
Spirulina Promotes Stem Cell Genesis and Protects against LPS Induced Declines in Neural Stem Cell Proliferation

Adult stem cells are present in many tissues including, skin, muscle, adipose, bone marrow, and in the brain. Neuroinflammation has been shown to be a potent negative regulator of stem cell and progenitor cell proliferation in the neurogenic regions of the brain. Recently we demonstrated that decreasing a key neuroinflammatory cytokine IL-1β in the hippocampus of aged rats reversed the age-related cognitive decline and increased neurogenesis in the age rats. We also have found that nutraceuticals have the potential to reduce neuroinflammation, and decrease oxidative stress. The objectives of this study were to determine if spirulina could protect the proliferative potential of hippocampal neural progenitor cells from an acute systemic inflammatory insult of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To this end, young rats were fed for 30 days a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.1% spirulina. On day 28 the rats were given a single i.p. injection of LPS (1 mg/kg). The following day the rats were injected with BrdU (50 mg/kg b.i.d. i.p.) and were sacrificed 24 hours after the first injection of BrdU. Quantification of the BrdU positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus demonstrated a decrease in proliferation of the stem/progenitor cells in the hippocampus as a result of the LPS insult. Furthermore, the diet supplemented with spirulina was able to negate the LPS induced decrease in stem/progenitor cell proliferation. In a second set of studies we examined the effects of spirulina either alone or in combination with a proprietary formulation (NT-020) of blueberry, green tea, vitamin D3 and carnosine on the function of bone marrow and CD34+ cells in vitro. Spirulina had small effects on its own and more than additive effects in combination with NT-020 to promote mitochondrial respiration and/or proliferation of these cells in culture. When examined on neural stem cells in culture spirulina increased proliferation at baseline and protected against the negative influence of TNFα to reduce neural stem cell proliferation. These results support the hypothesis that a diet enriched with spirulina and other nutraceuticals may help protect the stem/progenitor cells from insults.

Introduction

Neurogenesis is a life-long occurrence that is limited to specific sites within the brain; namely, the subventricular zone (SVZ), and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. The de novo production of new neurons into the hippocampus, has been shown to be important for some forms of learning [1]. While numerous studies have shown that neurogenesis is physiologically relevant for cognitive function, the relationship is complex (For review see: [2][3]). Nonetheless, neurogenesis is clearly linked to plasticity and repair mechanisms [4] and alterations in neurogenesis have been also been attributed to some affective disorders [5].

Two seminal studies, published simultaneously, a number of years ago showed that inflammation tightly regulates neurogenesis in the SGZ [6][7]. Ekdahl et al. (03) used LPS that they delivered into the cortex continuously by an osmotic mini pump. In the young adult rat, LPS-induced inflammation resulted in an 85% reduction in the number of new neurons born during the inflammatory insult [6]. Monje et al. (03) also found that LPS given systemically caused an increase in microglia activation and a decrease in neurogenesis, which could be prevented by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin [7].

Cytokines do appear capable of regulating several phases of the neurogenesis process. At low concentrations the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α induces proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPC), but at higher concentrations TNF-α results in program cell death [8]. TNF-α induced program cell death in the NPC is dependent on TNF receptor 1 (TNF-RI) [9] which is constitutively expressed by NPC in culture [10]. IL-1β can also directly suppress neurogenesis by blocking the production of cyclic dependent kinesis [10][11]. Inflammation also alters the way the new neurons integrate into the existing neuronal circuit [12].

References

1. Clelland CD, Choi M, Romberg C, Clemenson GD, Jr, Fragniere A, et al. A functional role for adult hippocampal neurogenesis in spatial pattern separation. Science. 2009;325:210–213. [PMC free article][PubMed]
2. Drapeau E, Nora Abrous D. Stem cell review series: role of neurogenesis in age-related memory disorders. Aging Cell. 2008;7:569–589. [PMC free article]  [PubMed]
3. Leuner B, Gould E, Shors TJ. Is there a link between adult neurogenesis and learning? Hippocampus. 2006;16:216–224.  [PubMed]
4. Yasuhara T, Hara K, Maki M, Masuda T, Sanberg CD, et al. Dietary supplementation exerts neuroprotective effects in ischemic stroke model. Rejuvenation Res. 2008;11:201–214.  [PubMed]
5. Sahay A, Hen R. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis in depression. Nat Neurosci. 2007;10:1110–1115.[PubMed]
6. Ekdahl CT, Claasen JH, Bonde S, Kokaia Z, Lindvall O. Inflammation is detrimental for neurogenesis in adult brain. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003;100:13632–13637. [PMC free article]  [PubMed]
7. Monje ML, Toda H, Palmer TD. Inflammatory blockade restores adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Science. 2003;302:1760–1765.  [PubMed]
8. Bernardino L, Agasse F, Silva B, Ferreira R, Grade S, et al. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha modulates survival, proliferation, and neuronal differentiation in neonatal subventricular zone cell cultures. Stem Cells. 2008;26:2361–2371.  [PubMed]
9. Sheng WS, Hu S, Ni HT, Rowen TN, Lokensgard JR, et al. TNF-alpha-induced chemokine production and apoptosis in human neural precursor cells. J Leukoc Biol. 2005;78:1233–1241.  [PubMed]
10. Iosif RE, Ekdahl CT, Ahlenius H, Pronk CJ, Bonde S, et al. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 is a negative regulator of progenitor proliferation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. J Neurosci. 2006;26:9703–9712.  [PubMed]
11. Koo JW, Duman RS. IL-1beta is an essential mediator of the antineurogenic and anhedonic effects of stress. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008;105:751–756. [PMC free article]  [PubMed]
12. Jakubs K, Bonde S, Iosif RE, Ekdahl CT, Kokaia Z, et al. Inflammation regulates functional integration of neurons born in adult brain. J

Hormones & Stem Cells

Hormones affect nearly every cellular processes in the body and rightly have an impact on clinical outcomes in stem cell therapies. To clinically optimize a patient to receive regenerative injection and stem cell therapies, it is important to consider their hormonal status overall.

Tissue optimization by way of nutrition has been discussed and these strategies will assist in the balancing of the hormonal status overall. As this is a huge body of information, for the sake of regenerative injection therapies we will focus on the anabolic steroid testosterone and the metabolic steroid thyroid. Optimization of these hormones may lead to improved outcomes in stem cell therapies.

Testosterone is anabolic and as such promotes tissue deposition and growth. This is well accepted and has been shown in the literature. The very premise of its anabolic effects logically lends itself to being helpful in orthopedic regenerative practices.

Testosterone is being used as an injectate to stimulate tissues locally in prolotherapy treatments for ligamentous laxity with good results [xv]. Testosterone has been shown to increase circulating endothelial progenitor cell numbers in men with late onset hypogonadism as well as promotes angiogenesis by increasing stromal cell-derived factor 1a (SDF-1a) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) [xvi, xvii]. This is but one mechanism that impacts stem cell therapy outcomes.

Testosterone’s beneficial androgenic effects on wound healing, immune status and inflammatory responses during acute wound healing have all been well documented [xviii, xix].

 

Thyroid hormone is a metabolic hormone that is a known stimulator of growth and metabolic rate. When thyroid is subclinically or clinically low it leads to decreased wound healing in patients. Even topical use of the hormone has been shown to increase healing [xx].

It is logical to assume that without optimal thyroid hormone status that stem cell therapies will not be as effective. In mammals it has been shown that stem cell proliferation is decreased, as is mitosis, due to hypothyroidism [xxi].

There are other known critical hormones that impact stem cell development, viability and differentiation in the body. The hormonal milieu of a patient is critical and should be clinically addressed prior to administration of stem cell therapies for optimal outcomes in treatment

 

 

 

 

Other Modalities to Boost Stem Cells

 

 

2-Reduce your calories – Even short-term calorie restriction can improve stem cell function. Try reducing your food intake by 20% for two weeks before you get your stem cells taken (making sure that you don’t substitute sugar as above).

3-Reduce your triglycerides – Triglycerides (TRG) are the storage system in the blood for carbohydrates that go unused. This one goes hand in hand with the first two recommendations and is also related to excess weight. This is one of our observations that comes from years of culturing cells. Stem cells grow poorly in patients with high TRG or who are obese. Get your triglycerides measured and reduce your carbs and food intake to bring them down to normal before you have your stem cells drawn.

4-Lift heavy weights and stay aerobically active – Research shows that more active older animals have better stem cells that create more boneexercise increases muscle stem cells, and weight lifters have better stem cells. In our clinic we have different

it turns out that we all have a naturally occurring, or endogenous, supply of stem cells circulating all throughout our bodies. They live in all of our organ systems, including our joints and circulate in our blood. One would assume that the younger the patient, the more stem cells they have floating around for use. This may not be the entire story, however.

I would argue that the HEALTHIER the patient, regardless of age, the better their stem cells will signal and respond, no matter how many you have. This means that we can directly affect our stem cells to work optimally in our favor! I find this to be true in practice every day. THIS is the ticket to true healing, pain relief and anti-aging!

Patients come back singing my praises for the excellent results they have after receiving Regenerative Injection Therapies like Prolotherapy or Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) treatments. While the doctor performing the treatment has a lot to do with the outcomes in terms of diagnosis and technique, the real credit should go to the patient. Excellent outcomes have as much to do with the patient’s overall health as they do with my skills.

Nutrition & Stem Cells

As would be expected, a nutritionally optimized individual will undoubtedly benefit more from stem cell therapies than a poorly nourished one. Patients who eat a variety of whole foods, adequate protein, omega-3 [i] and other healthy fats, as well as nutrient dense vegetables and leafy greens increase a favorable outcome with stem cell therapies.

Dietary protein allows for increased amino acids as well as zinc in the body to aide in the efforts of collagen deposition [ii,iii] .

Vitamin C from food sources also improve collagen status [iv]. Dietary collagen ingestion from animal sources is highly encouraged for aiding in collagen and cartilage synthesis.

Diets high in refined carbohydrates and sugar hinder healing and the immune system [v].

Patients with impaired blood sugar handling do not respond as well to treatment. Impaired wound healing and increased infection risk are well known in diabetics [vi]. These patients do not do as well clinically with regenerative injection therapies as a whole.

As a good portion of Americans are dealing with some level of obesity and blood sugar dysregulation, nutritional intervention can go a long way in helping these patients not only manage their musculoskeletal pain but improve their outcomes with regenerative and stem cell therapies.

A varied diet of nutritionally dense whole foods, high in protein and healthy fats, and low in refined carbohydrates and other inflammatory grains will ensure that optimal tissue and blood status is achieved by supplying the body with necessary macro and micronutrients for best clinical outcome

 Hormones & Stem Cells

Hormones affect nearly every cellular processes in the body and rightly have an impact on clinical outcomes in stem cell therapies. To clinically optimize a patient to receive regenerative injection and stem cell therapies, it is important to consider their hormonal status overall.

Tissue optimization by way of nutrition has been discussed and these strategies will assist in the balancing of the hormonal status overall. As this is a huge body of information, for the sake of regenerative injection therapies we will focus on the anabolic steroid testosterone and the metabolic steroid thyroid. Optimization of these hormones may lead to improved outcomes in stem cell therapies.

Testosterone is anabolic and as such promotes tissue deposition and growth. This is well accepted and has been shown in the literature. The very premise of its anabolic effects logically lends itself to being helpful in orthopedic regenerative practices.

Testosterone is being used as an injectate to stimulate tissues locally in prolotherapy treatments for ligamentous laxity with good results [xv]. Testosterone has been shown to increase circulating endothelial progenitor cell numbers in men with late onset hypogonadism as well as promotes angiogenesis by increasing stromal cell-derived factor 1a (SDF-1a) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) [xvi, xvii]. This is but one mechanism that impacts stem cell therapy outcomes.

Testosterone’s beneficial androgenic effects on wound healing, immune status and inflammatory responses during acute wound healing have all been well documented [xviii, xix].

Best Low Testosterone Supplements In The USA

Thyroid hormone is a metabolic hormone that is a known stimulator of growth and metabolic rate. When thyroid is subclinically or clinically low it leads to decreased wound healing in patients. Even topical use of the hormone has been shown to increase healing [xx].

 

It is logical to assume that without optimal thyroid hormone status that stem cell therapies will not be as effective. In mammals it has been shown that stem cell proliferation is decreased, as is mitosis, due to hypothyroidism [xxi].

There are other known critical hormones that impact stem cell development, viability and differentiation in the body. The hormonal milieu of a patient is critical and should be clinically addressed prior to administration of stem cell therapies for optimal outcomes in treatment.

Exercise and Stem Cells

Exercise may be the single most powerful tool that we mammals have for self preservation, health and longevity. There is no food source, supplement or medical treatment with such broad sweeping health benefits as exercise.Specifically, Strength/Resistance training to increase skeletal muscle mass indeed earns its title as the fountain of youth.

From increasing mitochondrial output as well as synthesis of new mitochondria, to improving blood sugar handling and insulin levels, strength training exercise is the all-around winner with the most broad reaching benefits of any medical intervention.

 

The effects of strength training on increasing Human Growth Hormone and testosterone levels are well known [vii, viii]. Mitochondrial synthesis happens in the face of a stressor on the body. Through stimulation of AMPK (amp-activated protein kinase) we see increases in mitochondrial biogenesis. AMPK is produced in the body as a response to a lack of cellular energy and an adaption to an applied stress such as fasting, ketosis and exercise [ix, x]. Exercise also reverses the inhibition of neural stem cells caused by alcohol consumption [xi].

 

Exercise also improves the structure and way mammalian collagen is laid down [xii] , which is beneficial following orthopedic regenerative injection therapies. Cartilage needs a certain amount of load for chondrocyte health as well as muscular integrity at the surrounding joint to thrive. Excess load on cartilage will impede its health, as will inactivity [xiii]. Obesity mixed with inactivity and low skeletal muscle mass, coupled with poor diet and impaired blood sugar handling is a recipe for arthritis. Collagen deposition and linear remodeling relies on forces across a joint in the proper vectors for optimal strength and integrity of ligaments and tendons [xiv]. Challenging a joint through normal range of motion in strength training puts a stressor on the enthesis, thereby promoting proper remodeling and integrity where these structures intermingle into bone.

These are all factors to be considered for tissue optimization in patients undergoing any stem cell procedure. One’s stem cells are only as good as one’s cellular milieu.

You likely have questions!

I am legally unable to answer individual health questions for non-patients without an online consultation or in-person visit.

If you are interested in becoming a patient or simply having a conversation about your pain, would like me to review your case or would like a referral to a practitioner in your area, this can be done via an Online Consultation.

Due to the high volume of requests, I am unable to answer individual requests for specific doctor referrals in your area. To find a doctor in your area who offers these therapies, please refer to my PRP 101 Insiders Cheat Sheet and Free Academy.

There is a tremendous amount of information on my website about these therapies, so please have a look around and see if you can’t find answers to your questions there. We have testimonials on every page and even a Research page with supporting studies. Enjoy!

 

References:

i. Hankenson, et al. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Enhance Ligament Fibroblast Collagen Formation in Association with Changes in Interleukin-6 Production. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Volume 223, Issue 1, pages 88-95, January 2000

ii. Oreffo, et al. Maternal protein deficiency affects mesenchymal stem cell activity in the developing offspring. Bone , Volume 33 , Issue 1, 100-107

iii. Benito-Ruiz, et al. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition.Volume 60, Supplement 2, 2009

iv. B Peterkofsky. Ascorbate requirement for hydroxylation and secretion of procollagen: relationship to inhibition of collagen synthesis in scurvy. Am J Clin Nutr December 1991. vol. 54 no. 6 1135S-1140S

v. Geerlings, Hoepelman. Immune dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology 26 (1999):259-265.

vi. Fadini, et al. Glucose tolerance is negatively associated with circulating progenitor cell levels. Diabetologia. October 2007, Volume 50, Issue 10, pp 2156-2163

vii. Craig, et al. Effects of progressive resistance training on growth hormone and testosterone levels in young and elderly subjects. Mech Ageing Dev. 1989 Aug;49(2):159-69.

viii. Hansen S, et al. The effect of short-term strength training on human skeletal muscle: the importance of physiologically elevated hormone levels. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 2001; 11: 347-354.

ix. Balakrishnan VS, Rao M, Menon V, et al. Resistance Training Increases Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN. 2010;5(6):996-1002.

x. Hawke, Thomas J. Muscle Stem Cells and Exercise Training. Exercise & Sport Sciences.Reviews: April 2005 – Volume 33 – Issue 2 – pp 63-68.

xii. Fulton T. et al. Exercise reverses ethanol inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation. Alcohol. Volume 33, Issue 1, May 2004, Pages 63-71.

xiii. Isaksson, et al. Physical Exercise Improves Properties of Bone and Its Collagen Network in Growing and Maturing Mice. Calcif Tissue Int (2009) 85:247-256 DOI 10.1007/s00223-009-9273-3.

xiv. Fox, et al. The Basic Science of Articular Cartilage: Structure, Composition, and Function. Sports Health. 2009 Nov; 1(6): 461-468. doi: 10.1177/1941738109350438.

xv. Ravin. The Use of Testosterone and Growth Hormone for Prolotherapy. Journal of Prolotherapy. Vol 2, Issue 4, Nov 2010: 495-503

xvi. Liao, et al. Testosterone replacement therapy can increase circulating endothelial progenitor cell number in men with late onset hypogonadism. Andrology. 2013 Jul;1(4):563-9. doi: 10.1111/j.2047-2927.2013.00086.x. Epub 2013 May 8.

xvii. Chen, et al. Testosterone replacement therapy promotes angiogenesis after acute myocardial infarction by enhancing expression of cytokines HIF-1a, SDF-1a and VEGF. Eur J Pharmacol. 2012 Jun 5;684(1-3):116-24. doi: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2012.03.032. Epub 2012 Mar 30.

xviii. Fimmel S, et al. Influence of physiological androgen levels on wound healing and immune status in men. Aging Male. 2005;8:166-174.

xix. Gilliver SC, et al. Androgens modulate the inflammatory response during acute wound healing. J. Cell Sci. 2006;119:722- 732.

xx. Joshua D. Safer,Thyroid Hormone and Wound Healing. Journal of Thyroid Research, vol. 2013, Article ID 124538, 5 pages, 2013. doi:10.1155/2013/124538

xxi. G. F. Lemkine. Adult neural stem cell cycling in vivo requires thyroid hormone and its alpha receptor. The FASEB Journal. Vol. 19 no. 7 863-865. February 23, 2005, doi:10.1096/fj.04-2916fje.

What are stem cells?

Stem cells are your reserve of “replacement cells.” Your body can use them to replace any kind of cell that is damaged, old or dying. They can morph into any kind of cell you need, including those for your eyes, kidneys, muscles, skin, heart or blood.

They also allow your body to regenerate damaged tissue in any organ — from your brain to your heart to your liver. 

What can affect your stem cells production?

As you age, your stem cells don’t repair and regenerate as well as they once did. Fatigue sets in. That can lead to poor regeneration or even degeneration of certain organs and tissues.

How the mitochondria correlates with stem cell production?

It’s as though your stem cells are running out of energy. You see, just like every other cell in your body, your stem cells contain tiny organelles called mitochondria. They provide the energy your cells need to function.

When mitochondria in stem cells are sluggish, your body’s stem cells can’t regenerate fast enough. The disease process starts to take over. That’s when you start to look, feel and act old.

What vitamin can power the mitochondria and boost stem cells?

There’s a simple vitamin that holds the key to restoring your stem cells and mitochondria to a biologically younger state.

Vitamin B to the rescue

In a study published in the journal Science, researchers revitalized stem cells in elderly mice by targeting a special molecule that helps mitochondria function properly.

They gave old mice a form of vitamin B3. B3 is also known as niacin, niacinamide or nicotinamide. And the mice taking the vitamin had dramatic anti-aging results!

Their muscles significantly regenerated through stem cell activity. The same thing happened with their brain and skin stem cells. And they also lived longer than mice that did not get the vitamin.1

In another study, half the mice were given a form of vitamin B3 for three or four months. The mice taking the vitamin had more energy, less weight gain, and improved insulin sensitivity. On a treadmill test, they could run 33% further than the control mice.2

How does vitamin B3 work?

In your body, B3 breaks down into a molecule called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). NAD+ is found in every cell in the body. It helps transfer the energy from the foods we eat to the mitochondria where it gets converted to cellular energy.

As NAD+ levels decline, mitochondrial function is impaired. And you start to see many of the physical signs of aging. Studies link decreases in NAD+ levels to:

•Brain degeneration

•Inflammation of blood vessels

•Fatty liver

•Increased belly fat

•Insulin resistance

•Fatigue and loss of muscle strength

The benefits of increasing your NAD+ levels

Increasing your levels of NAD+ can help increase energy in the mitochondria. And that can boost the regeneration abilities of your stem cells.

How to boost your NAD+ levels?

One way to boost NAD+ is severely restricting the number of calories you eat. That has been proven to raise NAD+ levels in cells.3 But no one wants to starve themselves.

The easier way to increase NAD+ is with vitamin B3. Boosting NAD+ with vitamin B3 can help prevent the decline in cellular energy as you age. It also helps preserve the anti-aging action of your stem cells. But B3 does even more.

Vitamin B3 is active in more than 50 metabolic functions in your body. It aids digestion and helps eliminate toxins. It acts as a powerful antioxidant. It assists in producing sex hormones. And it is vital to energizing and maintaining healthy cells of all kinds.

Build Better Mitochondria For Yourself

You can boost your niacin levels with food. The best sources are grass-fed beef and organ meats, pastured eggs, chicken and turkey, and wild-caught salmon and tuna. Good vegetarian sources include peanuts, beets, leafy greens, nuts, peas and beans.

But for the anti-aging benefits to your mitochondria and stem cells, you’ll have to supplement. Look for a supplement containing niacin, niacinamide or nicotinamide. I recommend getting 750 to 1,000 mg a day. Just don’t rush in too fast.

When you start taking B3 supplements you may get a reaction known as “niacin flush.” It feels like a burning and prickly sensation over the face, neck and chest. It’s harmless and usually lasts less than 20 minutes.

The reaction wears off as you continue to use B3, so be patient. It may take a few weeks, but eventually you’ll build up a tolerance.

I recommend starting at a small dose of 250 mg per day. At first, take it every other day and slowly work up. Increase the amount gradually every month until you get up to your target. You can also split your dose into twice a day to help reduce the flush.

to up to 2 grams per day.

 

Exercise and Stem Cells

Exercise may be the single most powerful tool that we mammals have for self preservation, health and longevity. There is no food source, supplement or medical treatment with such broad sweeping health benefits as exercise.Specifically, Strength/Resistance training to increase skeletal muscle mass indeed earns its title as the fountain of youth

rom increasing mitochondrial output as well as synthesis of new mitochondria, to improving blood sugar handling and insulin levels, strength training exercise is the all-around winner with the most broad reaching benefits of any medical intervention.

 

 

 

 

 

The effects of strength training on increasing Human Growth Hormone and testosterone levels are well known [vii, viii]. Mitochondrial synthesis happens in the face of a stressor on the body. Through stimulation of AMPK (amp-activated protein kinase) we see increases in mitochondrial biogenesis. AMPK is produced in the body as a response to a lack of cellular energy and an adaption to an applied stress such as fasting, ketosis and exercise [ix, x]. Exercise also reverses the inhibition of neural stem cells caused by alcohol consumption [xi].

Exercise also improves the structure and way mammalian collagen is laid down [xii] , which is beneficial following orthopedic regenerative injection therapies. Cartilage needs a certain amount of load for chondrocyte health as well as muscular integrity at the surrounding joint to thrive. Excess load on cartilage will impede its health, as will inactivity [xiii]. Obesity mixed with inactivity and low skeletal muscle mass, coupled with poor diet and impaired blood sugar handling is a recipe for arthritis. Collagen deposition and linear remodeling relies on forces across a joint in the proper vectors for optimal strength and integrity of ligaments and tendons [xiv]. Challenging a joint through normal range of motion in strength training puts a stressor on the enthesis, thereby promoting proper remodeling and integrity where these structures intermingle into bone.

These are all factors to be considered for tissue optimization in patients undergoing any stem cell procedure. One’s stem cells are only as good as one’s cellular milieu.

You likely have questions!

I am legally unable to answer individual health questions for non-patients without an online consultation or in-person visit.

If you are interested in becoming a patient or simply having a conversation about your pain, would like me to review your case or would like a referral to a practitioner in your area, this can be done via an Online Consultation.

Due to the high volume of requests, I am unable to answer individual requests for specific doctor referrals in your area. To find a doctor in your area who offers these therapies, please refer to my PRP 101 Insiders Cheat Sheet and Free Academy.

There is a tremendous amount of information on my website about these therapies, so please have a look around and see if you can’t find answers to your questions there. We have testimonials on every page and even a Research page with supporting studies. Enjoy!

References:

i. Hankenson, et al. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Enhance Ligament Fibroblast Collagen Formation in Association with Changes in Interleukin-6 Production. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Volume 223, Issue 1, pages 88-95, January 2000

ii. Oreffo, et al. Maternal protein deficiency affects mesenchymal stem cell activity in the developing offspring. Bone , Volume 33 , Issue 1, 100-107

iii. Benito-Ruiz, et al. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition.Volume 60, Supplement 2, 2009

iv. B Peterkofsky. Ascorbate requirement for hydroxylation and secretion of procollagen: relationship to inhibition of collagen synthesis in scurvy. Am J Clin Nutr December 1991. vol. 54 no. 6 1135S-1140S

v. Geerlings, Hoepelman. Immune dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology 26 (1999):259-265.

vi. Fadini, et al. Glucose tolerance is negatively associated with circulating progenitor cell levels. Diabetologia. October 2007, Volume 50, Issue 10, pp 2156-2163

vii. Craig, et al. Effects of progressive resistance training on growth hormone and testosterone levels in young and elderly subjects. Mech Ageing Dev. 1989 Aug;49(2):159-69.

viii. Hansen S, et al. The effect of short-term strength training on human skeletal muscle: the importance of physiologically elevated hormone levels. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 2001; 11: 347-354.

ix. Balakrishnan VS, Rao M, Menon V, et al. Resistance Training Increases Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN. 2010;5(6):996-1002.

x. Hawke, Thomas J. Muscle Stem Cells and Exercise Training. Exercise & Sport Sciences.Reviews: April 2005 – Volume 33 – Issue 2 – pp 63-68.

xii. Fulton T. et al. Exercise reverses ethanol inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation. Alcohol. Volume 33, Issue 1, May 2004, Pages 63-71.

xiii. Isaksson, et al. Physical Exercise Improves Properties of Bone and Its Collagen Network in Growing and Maturing Mice. Calcif Tissue Int (2009) 85:247-256 DOI 10.1007/s00223-009-9273-3.

xiv. Fox, et al. The Basic Science of Articular Cartilage: Structure, Composition, and Function. Sports Health. 2009 Nov; 1(6): 461-468. doi: 10.1177/1941738109350438.

xv. Ravin. The Use of Testosterone and Growth Hormone for Prolotherapy. Journal of Prolotherapy. Vol 2, Issue 4, Nov 2010: 495-503

xvi. Liao, et al. Testosterone replacement therapy can increase circulating endothelial progenitor cell number in men with late onset hypogonadism. Andrology. 2013 Jul;1(4):563-9. doi: 10.1111/j.2047-2927.2013.00086.x. Epub 2013 May 8.

xvii. Chen, et al. Testosterone replacement therapy promotes angiogenesis after acute myocardial infarction by enhancing expression of cytokines HIF-1a, SDF-1a and VEGF. Eur J Pharmacol. 2012 Jun 5;684(1-3):116-24. doi: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2012.03.032. Epub 2012 Mar 30.

xviii. Fimmel S, et al. Influence of physiological androgen levels on wound healing and immune status in men. Aging Male. 2005;8:166-174.

xix. Gilliver SC, et al. Androgens modulate the inflammatory response during acute wound healing. J. Cell Sci. 2006;119:722- 732.

xx. Joshua D. Safer,Thyroid Hormone and Wound Healing. Journal of Thyroid Research, vol. 2013, Article ID 124538, 5 pages, 2013. doi:10.1155/2013/124538

xxi. G. F. Lemkine. Adult neural stem cell cycling in vivo requires thyroid hormone and its alpha receptor. The FASEB Journal. Vol. 19 no. 7 863-865. February 23, 2005, doi:10.1096/fj.04-2916fje.

What are stem cells?

Stem cells are your reserve of “replacement cells.” Your body can use them to replace any kind of cell that is damaged, old or dying. They can morph into any kind of cell you need, including those for your eyes, kidneys, muscles, skin, heart or blood.

They also allow your body to regenerate damaged tissue in any organ — from your brain to your heart to your liver. 

What can affect your stem cells production?

As you age, your stem cells don’t repair and regenerate as well as they once did. Fatigue sets in. That can lead to poor regeneration or even degeneration of certain organs and tissues.

How the mitochondria correlates with stem cell production?

It’s as though your stem cells are running out of energy. You see, just like every other cell in your body, your stem cells contain tiny organelles called mitochondria. They provide the energy your cells need to function.

When mitochondria in stem cells are sluggish, your body’s stem cells can’t regenerate fast enough. The disease process starts to take over. That’s when you start to look, feel and act old.

What vitamin can power the mitochondria and boost stem cells?

There’s a simple vitamin that holds the key to restoring your stem cells and mitochondria to a biologically younger state.

Vitamin B to the rescue

In a study published in the journal Science, researchers revitalized stem cells in elderly mice by targeting a special molecule that helps mitochondria function properly.

They gave old mice a form of vitamin B3. B3 is also known as niacin, niacinamide or nicotinamide. And the mice taking the vitamin had dramatic anti-aging results!

Their muscles significantly regenerated through stem cell activity. The same thing happened with their brain and skin stem cells. And they also lived longer than mice that did not get the vitamin.1

In another study, half the mice were given a form of vitamin B3 for three or four months. The mice taking the vitamin had more energy, less weight gain, and improved insulin sensitivity. On a treadmill test, they could run 33% further than the control mice.2

How does vitamin B3 work?

In your body, B3 breaks down into a molecule called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). NAD+ is found in every cell in the body. It helps transfer the energy from the foods we eat to the mitochondria where it gets converted to cellular energy.

As NAD+ levels decline, mitochondrial function is impaired. And you start to see many of the physical signs of aging. Studies link decreases in NAD+ levels to:

  • Brain degeneration
  • Inflammation of blood vessels
  • Fatty liver
  • Increased belly fat
  • Insulin resistance
  • Fatigue and loss of muscle strength

The benefits of increasing your NAD+ levels

Increasing your levels of NAD+ can help increase energy in the mitochondria. And that can boost the regeneration abilities of your stem cells.

How to boost your NAD+ levels?

One way to boost NAD+ is severely restricting the number of calories you eat. That has been proven to raise NAD+ levels in cells.3 But no one wants to starve themselves.

The easier way to increase NAD+ is with vitamin B3. Boosting NAD+ with vitamin B3 can help prevent the decline in cellular energy as you age. It also helps preserve the anti-aging action of your stem cells. But B3 does even more.

Vitamin B3 is active in more than 50 metabolic functions in your body. It aids digestion and helps eliminate toxins. It acts as a powerful antioxidant. It assists in producing sex hormones. And it is vital to energizing and maintaining healthy cells of all kinds.

Build Better Mitochondria For Yourself

You can boost your niacin levels with food. The best sources are grass-fed beef and organ meats, pastured eggs, chicken and turkey, and wild-caught salmon and tuna. Good vegetarian sources include peanuts, beets, leafy greens, nuts, peas and beans.

But for the anti-aging benefits to your mitochondria and stem cells, you’ll have to supplement. Look for a supplement containing niacin, niacinamide or nicotinamide. I recommend getting 750 to 1,000 mg a day. Just don’t rush in too fast.

When you start taking B3 supplements you may get a reaction known as “niacin flush.” It feels like a burning and prickly sensation over the face, neck and chest. It’s harmless and usually lasts less than 20 minutes.

The reaction wears off as you continue to use B3, so be patient. It may take a few weeks, but eventually you’ll build up a tolerance.

I recommend starting at a small dose of 250 mg per day. At first, take it every other day and slowly work up. Increase the amount gradually every month until you get up to your target. You can also split your dose into twice a day to help reduce the flush.

to up to 2 grams per day.

 

Stem cell therapy represents both a major medical advance and a great hope in the fight against degenerative conditions for which medicine has so far only provided short-lived or temporary solutions.
It is now possible, in some countries, to have injections of adult stem cells extracted from bone marrow, or indeed ‘cultivated’ after extraction from adipose tissue, though more generalised application of this method is still some way off, due to its cost and complexity. 

Combatting cellular ageing with stem cells

¤ It is this issue that most studies have concentrated on in recent years, and certain researchers have indeed managed – by using nutrients and botanical extracts – to stimulate and increase numbers of adult stem cells in bone marrow.

¤ Researchers are focusing on bone marrow as the source of this regeneration activity, as these cells are renewed on a daily basis, producing new lines of red and white blood cells and platelets. Mature cells are then released into the bloodstream to fulfil their vital, regenerative functions.

Stem Cells Activator, an innovative anti-ageing formulation

¤ Among the nutrients shown to be most active in this area are:• Extract of Polygonum multiflorum or FO-TI, which when given at the optimal dose of 800mg of a 12:1 extract, is recognised in Chinese medicine as an effective blood tonic, and in particular as a major factor in longevity due to its ability to increase levels of circulating superoxide dismutase (SOD) and monoamine oxidase. Mouse studies conducted in Taiwan show that after daily administration of high-dose Polygonum multiflorum, significant improvements were noted in red blood cells, and in particular, a higher percentage of hematocrit compared with a control group. This research also shows that doses at this level stimulate proliferation of stromal and haematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow.
• Fucoidan is recognised for its immune-stimulant properties and is widely used in Japan to treat cancer. It is extracted from a type of algae, Laminaria japonica, part of the laminaria family. This sulphated polysaccharide boosts the immune system, helping protect the body more effectively against different viruses and in particular, promoting apoptosis (programmed cell death) of cancer cells.
– Like other active algae extracts, fucoidan has demonstrated, at certain concentrations, the ability to stimulate bone marrow stem cells. Studies showed it produced an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity, and at a molecular level, improved the expression of specific genes related to osteogenesis and osteogenic differentiation, thus promoting bone regeneration.
– By directly affecting stem cell mobilisation, fucoidan facilitates more effective repair of damaged tissue, both in cardiovascular health, following a heart attack, and the health of joints and vital organs.
• Astragaloside IV is already known for its telomere-lengthening effects. Research shows this saponin stimulates the immune system in various ways, in particular, by increasing stem cells in the spinal cord and lymphatic tissue and encouraging them to develop into active immune cells.
– Astragaloside IV also supports proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells, pluripotent tissue stem cells that help form skeletal connective tissue such as bone and cartilage.
• Extract of blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum) can restore certain cell functions that decline over time. It has been shown to increase neurogenesis in the brains of elderly laboratory rats. Researchers experimented with neural tissue transplantation following cell damage caused by neurodegenerative disease or brain injury. As a general rule, transplanted tissue has very little chance of surviving, particularly in older recipients. But when animals were supplemented with blueberry extracts, the growth of the transplantation was more vigorous and cell organisation was comparable to that observed in younger recipients. Blueberry extracts confer their beneficial effects by increasing proliferation of neural stem cells.
• Beta 1,3/1,6 glucan is a polysaccharide extracted from oats. Most research has highlighted its powerful immune-modulatory effects. The latest studies suggest that beta 1,3/1,6 glucan promotes haematopoiesis and boosts proliferation of stem cells, thus facilitating repair of white blood cells in bone marrow.
• L-carnosine improves replicative capacity of myoblast cultures.
– Certains myoblasts, called satellite cells, remain on the periphery of muscle fibres, intervening in its repair when damaged. However, with increasing age comes sarcopaenia (loss of muscle mass) and the satellite cells are no longer able to repair the damage. According to a study on myoblasts, the stem cells responsible for skeletal muscle formation, supplementing with L-carnosine increases their replicative capacity and also reduces the activity of beta-galactosidase.

¤ Epidemiological studies show that a diet rich in colourful fruits and vegetables, and thus polyphenols, can lower the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as cognitive deficiency, dementia, Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease. Research has demonstrated that certain natural substances can affect adult stem cells, and as a result, increase neurogenesis and improve cognitive ability. Scientists therefore examined a synergistic combination of extracts of blueberry, green tea, L-carnosine and vitamin D3. When given to rats, this unique combination clearly reduced oxidative stress, and in particular, demonstrated its ability to encourage proliferation of neural stem cells as well as their migration to damaged brain cells (for example, following a stroke).While stem cells are the subject of extensive study in the field of anti-ageing medicine, other approaches have also revealed positive results in combatting the effects of ageing. For example, cell metabolism can be stimulated by supplementing with nicotinamide riboside. Scientists have also discovered that damaged DNA can be repaired with the help of certain molecules such as l’AC-11®.

What improvements can be expected from using Stem Cells Activator?
• an increase in average lifespan and quality of life, as a direct result of enhanced capacity for cell replication ;
• a decrease in the decline in immune function that increases susceptibility to infection, chronic inflammatory attacks and degenerative diseases;
• an improvement in the condition and pain associated with degenerative complaints.
What was only the hope or vision of a few has just become the subject of the Nobel Prize in Medicine 2012 and could tomorrow become a reality …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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