REDOX Mechanism

Redox (short for reduction–oxidation reaction)  is a chemical reaction in which the oxidation states of atoms are changed. (1) Any such reaction involves both a reduction process and a complementary oxidation process, two key concepts involved with electron transfer processes. (2) Redox reactions include all chemical reactions in which atoms have their oxidation state changed; in general, redox reactions involve the transfer of electrons between chemical species. The chemical species from which the electron is stripped is said to have been oxidized, while the chemical species to which the electron is added is said to have been reduced. It can be explained in simple terms:

 Oxidation is the loss of electrons or an increase in oxidation state by a molecule, atom, or ion.

 Reduction is the gain of electrons or a decrease in oxidation state by a molecule, atom, or ion.

As an example, during the combustion of wood, oxygen from the air is reduced, gaining electrons from the carbon.[3] Although oxidation reactions are commonly associated with the formation of oxides from oxygen molecules, oxygen is not necessarily included in such reactions, as other chemical species can serve the same function.[3]

The reaction can occur relatively slowly, as in the case of rust, or more quickly, as in the case of fire. There are simple redox processes, such as the oxidation of carbon to yield carbon dioxide (CO2) or the reduction of carbon by hydrogen to yield methane (CH4), and more complex processes such as the oxidation of glucose (C6H12O6) in the human body.

Biology and Medicine

Many important biological processes involve redox reactions. Cellular respiration, for instance, is the oxidation of glucose (C6H12O6) to CO2 and the reduction of oxygen to water. The summary equation for cell respiration is:

C6H12O6 + 6 O2 → 6 CO2 + 6 H2O

 

The process of cell respiration also depends heavily on the reduction of NAD+ to NADH and the reverse reaction (the oxidation of NADH to NAD+). Photosynthesis and cellular respiration are complementary, but photosynthesis is not the reverse of the redox reaction in cell respiration:

6 CO2 + 6 H2O + light energy → C6H12O6 + 6 O2

Biological energy is frequently stored and released by means of redox reactions. Photosynthesis involves the reduction of carbon dioxide into sugars and the oxidation of water into molecular oxygen.

The reverse reaction, respiration, oxidizes sugars to produce carbon dioxide and water. As intermediate steps, the reduced carbon compounds are used to reduce nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to NADH, which then contributes to the creation of a proton gradient, which drives the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and is maintained by the reduction of oxygen. In animal cells, mitochondria perform similar functions. See the Membrane potential.

Free radical reactions are redox reactions that occur as a part of homeostasis and killing microorganisms, where an electron detaches from a molecule and then reattaches almost instantaneously. Free radicals are a part of redox molecules and can become harmful to the human body if they do not reattach to the redox molecule or an antioxidant. Unsatisfied free radicals can spur the mutation of cells they encounter and are, thus, causes of cancer.

The term redox state is often used to describe the balance of GSH/GSSG, NAD+/NADH and NADP+/NADPH in a biological system such as a cell or organ. The redox state is reflected in the balance of several sets of metabolites (e.g., lactate and pyruvate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate), whose interconversion is dependent on these ratios. An abnormal redox state can develop in a variety of deleterious situations, such as hypoxia, shock, and sepsis. Redox mechanism also control some cellular processes. Redox proteins and their genes must be co-located for redox regulation according to the CoRR hypothesis for the function of DNA in mitochondria and chloroplasts.

Redox cycling

A wide variety of aromatic compounds are enzymatically reduced to form free radicals that contain one more electron than their parent compounds. In general, the electron donor is any of a wide variety of flavoenzymes and their coenzymes. Once formed, these anion free radicals reduce molecular oxygen to superoxide, and regenerate the unchanged parent compound. The net reaction is the oxidation of the flavoenzyme’s coenzymes and the reduction of molecular oxygen to form superoxide. This catalytic behavior has been described as futile cycle or redox cycling.

Examples of redox cycling-inducing molecules are the herbicide paraquat and other viologens and quinones such as menadione.[9]

Reference and Precision Notes

(1). Atoms, with particles and waves,  are the basic units of Matter and Life. In Holistic Medicine and quantum physics, one of the keys that has some influence on the shaping of these elements is Intentionality

(2). See “Redox Reactions”. wiley.com.

3 Haustein, Catherine Hinga (2014). K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner, eds. Oxidation-reduction reaction. The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. 5th edition. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Group.

(4) Bockris, John O’M.; Reddy, Amulya K. N. (1970). Modern Electrochemistry. Plenum Press. pp. 352–3.

5  Harper, Douglas. “redox”. Online Etymology Dictionary.

6  Hudlický, Miloš (1996). Reductions in Organic Chemistry. Washington, D.C.: American Chemical Society. p. 429. ISBN 0-8412-3344-6.

7  Hudlický, Miloš (1990). Oxidations in Organic Chemistry. Washington, D.C.: American Chemical Society. p. 456. ISBN 0-8412-1780-7.

8 Electrode potential values from Petrucci, R. H.; Harwood, W. S.; Herring, F. G. (2002). General Chemistry (8th ed.). Prentice-Hall. p. 832.

9 “gutier.doc” (PDF). Retrieved 2008-06-30. (2.76 MiB)

10 Robertson, William (2010). More Chemistry Basics. National Science Teachers Association. p. 82.

Screen Shot 2017-12-04 at 3.55.07 PM

Top: ascorbic acid (reduced form of Vitamin C)

Screen Shot 2017-12-04 at 3.55.19 PM

Bottom: dehydroascorbic acid (oxidized form of Vitamin C)

 

gifREDOXNaF

Sodium and fluorine bonding ionically to form sodium fluoride. Sodium loses its outer electron to give it a stable electron configuration, and this electron enters the fluorine atom exothermically. The oppositely charged ions are then attracted to each other. The sodium is oxidized, and the fluorine is reduced. Image: CC  Wdcf

 

 

 

Happiness Medicine & Holistic Medicine Posts

Categories

Translate:

Follow me on Twitter

Translate »
error: Content is protected !!