Endometriosis

One estimate is that 10.8 million people are affected globally as of 2015.[5] Other sources estimate about 6–10% of women are affected.[1] Endometriosis is most common in those in their thirties and forties; however, it can begin in girls as early as 8 years old.[2][3]

Endometriosis is a condition in which cells similar to those in the endometrium, the layer of tissue that normally covers the inside of the uterus, grow outside of it.[7][8] Most often this is on the ovaries, Fallopian tubes, and tissue around the uterus and ovaries; however, in rare cases it may also occur in other parts of the body.[2] The main symptoms are pelvic pain and infertility.[1] Nearly half of those affected have chronic pelvic pain, while in 70% pain occurs during menstruation.[1] Pain during sexual intercourse is also common.[1] Infertility occurs in up to half of women affected.[1] Less common symptoms include urinary or bowel symptoms.[1] About 25% of women have no symptoms.[1] Endometriosis can have both social and psychological effects.[9]

The cause is not entirely clear.[1] Risk factors include having a family history of the condition.[2] The areas of endometriosis bleed each month, resulting in inflammation and scarring.[1][2] The growths due to endometriosis are not cancer.[2] Diagnosis is usually based on symptoms in combination with medical imaging,[2] however, biopsy is the most sure method of diagnosis.[2] Other causes of similar symptoms include pelvic inflammatory disease, irritable bowel syndrome, interstitial cystitis, and fibromyalgia.[1]

Tentative evidence suggests that the use of combined oral contraceptives reduces the risk of endometriosis.[4] Exercise and avoiding large amounts of alcohol may also be preventive.[2]

Pollution….MORE Alter

PathoPathology

Researchers are investigating the possibility that the immune system may not be able to cope with the cyclic onslaught of retrograde menstrual fluid. In this context there is interest in studying the relationship of endometriosis to autoimmune disease, allergic reactions, and the impact of toxic materials

 

Treatment

In conventional medicine, there is no cure for endometriosis but a number of treatments may improve symptoms.[1] This may include pain medication, hormonal treatments or surgery.[2] The recommended pain medication is usually a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), such as naproxen.[2] Taking the active component of the birth control pill continuously or using an intrauterine device with progestogen may also be useful.[2] Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist may improve the ability of those who are infertile to get pregnant.[2] Surgical removal of endometriosis may be used to treat those whose symptoms are not manageable with other treatments.[2]

In holistic medicine….More alter

Aromatase inhibitors….progesterone etc…. diet etc

Concludion

References[edit]

1^ Jump up to:
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Bulletti C, Coccia ME, Battistoni S, Borini A (August 2010). “Endometriosis and infertility”. Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics. 27 (8): 441–7. doi:10.1007/s10815-010-9436-1. PMC 2941592. PMID 20574791.

2^ Jump up to:
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y “Endometriosis”. womenshealth.gov. 13 February 2017. Archived from the original on 13 May 2017. Retrieved 20 May 2017.

3^ Jump up to:
a b c McGrath PJ, Stevens BJ, Walker SM, Zempsky WT (2013). Oxford Textbook of Paediatric Pain. OUP Oxford. p. 300. ISBN 9780199642656. Archived from the original on 2017-09-10.

4^ Jump up to:
a b c Vercellini P, Eskenazi B, Consonni D, Somigliana E, Parazzini F, Abbiati A, Fedele L (1 March 2011). “Oral contraceptives and risk of endometriosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis”. Human Reproduction Update. 17 (2): 159–70. doi:10.1093/humupd/dmq042. PMID 20833638.

5^ Jump up to:
a b c “Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015”. Lancet. 388 (10053): 1545–1602. October 2016. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31678-6. PMC 5055577. PMID 27733282.

6 Jump up
^
“Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015”. Lancet. 388 (10053): 1459–1544. October 2016. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31012-1. PMC 5388903. PMID 27733281.

7 Jump up
^
“Endometriosis: Overview”. www.nichd.nih.gov. Archived from the original on 18 May 2017. Retrieved 20 May 2017.

8 Jump up
^
“Endometriosis: Condition Information”. www.nichd.nih.gov. Archived from the original on 30 April 2017. Retrieved 20 May 2017.

9 Jump up
^
Culley L, Law C, Hudson N, Denny E, Mitchell H, Baumgarten M, Raine-Fenning N (1 November 2013). “The social and psychological impact of endometriosis on women’s lives: a critical narrative review”. Human Reproduction Update. 19 (6): 625–39. doi:10.1093/humupd/dmt027. PMID 23884896.

10^ Jump up to:
a b GBD 2013 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators (January 2015). “Global, regional, and national age-sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013”. Lancet. 385 (9963): 117–71. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61682-2. PMC 4340604. PMID 25530442.

11^ Jump up to:
a b c Brosens I (2012). Endometriosis: Science and Practice. John Wiley & Sons. p. 3. ISBN 9781444398496.

12^ Jump up to:
a b Stratton P, Berkley KJ (2011). “Chronic pelvic pain and endometriosis: translational evidence of the relationship and implications”. Human Reproduction Update. 17 (3): 327–46. doi:10.1093/humupd/dmq050. PMC 3072022. PMID 21106492.

13 Jump up
^
“What are the symptoms of endometriosis?”. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved 2018-10-04.

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